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Archive for October, 2009

Free GIS E-Newsletters, Don’t Miss an Opportunity!

There are many FREE GIS-related newsletters and/or e-magazines out there that you can feed to your email account or Google homepage through an RSS feed on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Many of these newsletters contain not only GIS industry information but also GIS job information.

It can get a bit annoying having all these feeds crowding your inbox along with information flowing in from GIS blogs, Twitter accounts, and Facebook posts. However, here are the facts: if you aren’t reading these, someone else is. And guess what? They are your competition! If you really want to land that great job opportunity, you’ll need to spend 30 to 60 minutes per day doing research. The early bird does not get the worm anymore. The bird who gets the worm is the one who never went to sleep in the first place.

Subscribe to the following major email GIS newsletters/e-magazines. All for free…

….To continue with this post and find the answers to these interesting questions along with tons of other related material, check out Careers in GIS: an Unfiltered Guide to Finding a GIS Job as an eBook or paperback!

Which Database Platform is Best to Know for GIS?

Databases are the backbone of any GIS system. They are the “I” in GIS. This means that a knowledge of databases (particularly the software used to manage them) should be somewhere in your repertoire. And by “knowledge,” I mean learn the basics of a database system. How to access a table. How to make a query. How to log in. These are all considered basic skills. When you finally get that GIS job you want, you’ll likely either need to link map files on your desktop or from the Internet to records stored in a database. Or you’ll need to store all of your data records, including map files, in a database management system. Of course, knowing how to operate one database platform doesn’t mean you’re automatically familiar with all of them. Regardless, knowing even one DBMS gives you two advantages: 1) It shows an employer that you’re familiar with the concepts of a DBMS.  2) It shows an employer you can learn how to work with different database platforms.

I’ll bet you’re wondering this: “Which database system should I become familiar with?” A more important question to ask is this: “Which database system CAN I become familiar with?”…

….To continue with this post and find the answers to these interesting questions along with tons of other related material, check out Careers in GIS: an Unfiltered Guide to Finding a GIS Job as an eBook or paperback!

Should You Be a Big Fish in a Little GIS Pond?

When you look for a new job or move on to a better job, you should ask yourself: Do I want to be a big fish in a little GIS pond or little fish in a big GIS pond?  This is very important because it may determine if you grow and mature as a GIS professional.

There are plenty of “assembly line” GIS positions out there. These are positions where you’ll encounter the same tasks repeatedly. These positions are usually in organizations where you are the “little fish.” You are one of many with the same skills. These positions are usually found at GIS consulting firms, large local government offices, and offices with more than two or three GIS users. Professional development in these environments might be hard to come by. No training on new software or new methods, no conference attendance, no challenges, no GIS stimulation. The cool stuff is usually left to your superiors who are more experienced.

Then how are you ever supposed to learn if you never get a chance?…

….To continue with this post and find the answers to these interesting questions along with tons of other related material, check out Careers in GIS: an Unfiltered Guide to Finding a GIS Job as an eBook or paperback!

Employer’s Websites: The Best Kept Secret

After exhausting every search engine to locate jobs on the Internet, you’re probably coming across the same job postings every day or ones that have just been reposted on different sites. To make you feel even better about your job hunt, you’ve probably heard about someone who landed a great GIS job that you would’ve loved to apply for. How do people find out about these jobs? Many times these postings were made public, but you weren’t looking for them in the right places.

When searching the Internet for available positions, you’re likely searching using two main types of websites to locate postings: 1) Websites where HR manually loads the posting information to the website.  2) Websites that scour the Internet looking for job postings that match the description or keywords you enter (web crawlers, job search engines, clearinghouses, job consolidation sites, etc.).

It’s the second type of site that can be misleading. Employer’s web servers may sometimes block these “search engine” or “web crawler” type sites from accessing or publishing their online information. The way these search engine sites comb the web for jobs can make them appear malicious and are therefore blocked by a firewall or some other sort of web server security. This usually happens with local government websites and/or sites associated with universities, but it can happen with corporate sites too. Also, jobs posted on an employer’s website can sometimes be so new that the information hasn’t existed long enough to be detected by a job consolidation website.  You may still find this job posting eventually but there may be a delay of a few days which could mean the difference between someone seeing your resume or your resume ending up at the bottom of the pile.

So how are you supposed to find out about these jobs?…

….To continue with this post and find the answers to these interesting questions along with tons of other related material, check out Careers in GIS: an Unfiltered Guide to Finding a GIS Job as an eBook or paperback!

How to search the web for GIS jobs: Part 2

The jobs are out there.  Finding them is a different story.  Do not assume that every available job is automatically posted on the Internet.  Postings do not magically appear on websites like CareerBuilder.com and the GIS Jobs Clearinghouse.  Websites like those require someone to load a posting to the site and occasionally a fee is involved.  Businesses and government offices do not always have human resource staff to help fill a position.  Available positions are more likely just put on their institution’s website and that is as far as it goes.  It’s up to YOU to find it.

Indeed.com is one of the better websites I have come across that acts as a search engine collecting information from other job search sites like Monster.com, Dice.com, etc.  In other words, it is a one stop shop that will allow you to narrow your search by proximity, salary range, etc.  Also, if you visit Indeed.com on multiple occasions, it will remember which postings you have seen and which ones are new (although you may have to do a bit of filtering but not much).  However, I would suggest that you do not limit your search by salary or enter several keywords either.  A simple keyword search on “GIS” should do the trick.  Sometimes being too specific will leave a good position undiscovered.